Getting America Right – Book Review

March 7th, 2006 at 5:28pm (Books, Conservativism)

Rebecca Hagelin, vice-president of The Heritage Foundation has reviewed Ed Feulner’s Getting America Right: The True Conservative Values Our Nation Needs Today. Feulner was in the Reagan administration and was president of The Heritage Foundation for over thirty-years. From what Hagelin says, it looks like an important book for small-c conservatives to read, including those of us in Canada.

Here’s a quote:

Conservatives need to reacquaint themselves with their principles. There’s a reason that conservatism has survived as a popular movement for so many years — because it’s grounded in reality and proven wisdom. Unlike liberalism, it isn’t based on wishful thinking, shallow reasoning and good intentions. It works. 

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The Marketing of Evil Review

March 6th, 2006 at 11:00am (Books, Media Bias)

Tim Challies has reviewed David Kupelian’s The Marketing of Evil: How Radicals, Elitists, and Pseud-Experts Sell Us Corrpution Disguised as Freedom. It looks like an excellent book. Check out what Challies has to say.

The Marketing of Evil is a book that will make you wince. It will make you angry. It will make you appreciate or understand the brilliance of the evil one who is engaged in an all-out war against the biblical foundation upon which America was founded. And hopefully, it will serve as a wake-up call that evil is not merely an abstract concept, but is a force, a strategy, that is cunningly marketed and brilliantly deployed against all that is good.

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Same-Sex Marriage in Canada – A Lesson in Statist History

March 1st, 2006 at 9:10am (Books, Canada, Freedom, Same-sex marriage, Western Civ)

In the excellent book Divorcing Marriage: Unveiling the Dangers in Canada’s New Social Experiment (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2004) edited by Daniel Cere and Douglas Farrow, Canadians are given an opportunity to evaluate the issue of same-sex marriage from an objective and scholarly perspective. Eleven scholars come together in this one volume to offer their analysis from their respective areas of specialization.

Over the course of time I may try to summarise and evaluate the various essays in this book with the hope of disseminating the information they provide as well as offering some thoughts of my own.

Of particular interest to me today is the essay written by one of the editors, Daniel Cere, entitled “War of the Ring.” Cere provides a historical survey of Canadian politics related to same-sex marriage, going back only a few years to 1999 when the federal parliament reaffirmed the traditional definition of marriage. How far we have come in only a few years! Cere catalogues the main events that took place showing how we got to where we are today. I must tell you, it has been a frightening ride, especially for one like myself who is horrified by statism and government interventionism. I enjoy my democratic freedom as a Canadian, and to read the events that gave legal status to same-sex marriage in Canada is nothing but scary. Canadian rights and opinions have been left in the lurch in favour of the opinions of elitist politicians and judges who act as though they are a law unto themselves. Cere also offers a philosophical analysis of this change in marriage, poking at the presuppositions that lie behind this burning desire to push same-sex legislation through – at the cost of freedom.

Daniel Cere writes as one who knows the issues involved, and so he should, as he is the director of the Institute for the Study of Marriage, Law and Culture in Montreal.

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