Twisted Logic – The BC Human Rights Tribunal and the K of C

March 2nd, 2006 at 4:19pm (Canada, Church & State, Freedom, Same-sex marriage)

[HT: Terry O’Neill at The Shotgun Blog]

The Centre for Cultural Renewal has published their analysis of the British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal’s ruling on same-sex marriage as it relates to freedom of religion. In November of 2005 a lesbian couple sought out a Knights of Columbus hall to rent for their wedding. When the K of C refused, they were brought before the Tribunal. The ruling was confusing in that the K of C seemingly were exonerated for turning the lesbian couple down. Yet, at the same time they were fined for not allowing them to rent their hall.

Here’s an important quote that sums up much of this situation:

The harm in the analysis conducted by the Tribunal exists in the risk of forcing persons to act against their religious convictions because someone who does not share that belief concludes that it is not essential.”

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Same-Sex Marriage in Canada – A Lesson in Statist History

March 1st, 2006 at 9:10am (Books, Canada, Freedom, Same-sex marriage, Western Civ)

In the excellent book Divorcing Marriage: Unveiling the Dangers in Canada’s New Social Experiment (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2004) edited by Daniel Cere and Douglas Farrow, Canadians are given an opportunity to evaluate the issue of same-sex marriage from an objective and scholarly perspective. Eleven scholars come together in this one volume to offer their analysis from their respective areas of specialization.

Over the course of time I may try to summarise and evaluate the various essays in this book with the hope of disseminating the information they provide as well as offering some thoughts of my own.

Of particular interest to me today is the essay written by one of the editors, Daniel Cere, entitled “War of the Ring.” Cere provides a historical survey of Canadian politics related to same-sex marriage, going back only a few years to 1999 when the federal parliament reaffirmed the traditional definition of marriage. How far we have come in only a few years! Cere catalogues the main events that took place showing how we got to where we are today. I must tell you, it has been a frightening ride, especially for one like myself who is horrified by statism and government interventionism. I enjoy my democratic freedom as a Canadian, and to read the events that gave legal status to same-sex marriage in Canada is nothing but scary. Canadian rights and opinions have been left in the lurch in favour of the opinions of elitist politicians and judges who act as though they are a law unto themselves. Cere also offers a philosophical analysis of this change in marriage, poking at the presuppositions that lie behind this burning desire to push same-sex legislation through – at the cost of freedom.

Daniel Cere writes as one who knows the issues involved, and so he should, as he is the director of the Institute for the Study of Marriage, Law and Culture in Montreal.

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